Enrico Rava
trumpet
Geri Allen
piano
Enrico Rava

Enrico Ravais a hugely popular trumpet player (born in Trieste, Italy in 1939), who almost single-handedly brought Italian jazz to international attention. He began playing Dixieland trombone in Turin, but after hearing Miles Davis, switched instruments and embraced the modern style. Other key meetings were with Gato Barbieri, with whom he recorded movie soundtracks in 1962, and Chet Baker. He began to play with Steve Lacy; he also teamed up with South African expatriates Louis Moholo and John Dyani and recorded The Forest and the Zoo (ESP) live in Argentina. In 1967, he moved to New York, playing with Roswell Rudd, Marion Brown, Rashied Ali, Cecil Taylor, and Charlie Haden. In a brief return to Europe, Rava recorded with Lee Konitz (Stereokonitz, RCA) and Manfred Schoof (European Echoes, FMP). From 1969 to 1976, he was back in New York, recording Escalator Over the Hill with Carla Bley’s Jazz Composers’ Orchestra. After his first album as a leader, Il Giro del Giorno in 80 Mondi (Black Saint), he began to lead his own pianoless quartets and quintets. His recorded output numbers 100 records, 30 as a leader.


Geri Allen

Geri Allenis the new Director of Jazz Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. She was a Guggenheim fellow, the first recipient of the Soul Train Lady of Soul Award for jazz, and the first woman and youngest person to receive the Danish JAZZPAR Prize.

In 2010, Allen received the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Award, and under her direction, Pitt recently hosted a cyber symposium on Mary Lou Williams—a real-time collaboration with six other universities and institutions across the country. Allen contributed the original musical score to Lisa Gay Hamilton’s Peabody Award-winning film Beah: A Black Woman Speaks and arrangements for Andy Bey’s Grammy nominated American Song.

Berklee College of Music awarded her an honorary doctorate in 2014, and the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Inc., honored her with its Jazz Legacy Award this past September. Allen’s distinguished 30-year performance career includes collaborations with a wide variety of artists, from Ornette Coleman, Tony Williams, Charles Lloyd, Trio3, Nathan Davis, the Supremes, Ron Carter, Lee Konitz, Marcus Belgrave, and Betty Carter to Joan Rivers,  Terri Lyne Carrington, Esperanza Spalding, Tia Fuller, and many other greats.